Gross-Motor Skills

New parents tend to invest in tons of baby gear—a Moses basket, a buggy, a baby swing, a bouncy seat, a car seat, and, of course, nappies, nappies, and more nappies. Sometime around the one-year mark, though, parents realise that they need to invest in one more vital item: a good pair of shoes…for themselves. When you have a toddler, it sometimes feels like you’re never ever going to have the chance to sit down again. After all, toddlers love to be on the go and are constantly looking for ways to try out their developing gross-motor skills—walking, running, hopping, and even climbing stairs and furniture. (Yikes!)

We get it. Toddlers learn to move and move to learn. It’s exhausting for parents, but crucial for kids. That’s why we’re so focused on movement in Kindermusik class. We stomp hello at the beginning of the lesson, fly like birds, stand and stretch our arms high like trees, and dance around the room to strengthen and refine the children’s gross-motor skills. All this movement also stimulates the release of brain chemicals that support memory and learning! And the best news for you: no shoes required.

 Everyday Connection: I got moves like…. Put on some music and play the “I got moves like…” game. Name an animal and ask your toddler to move like that animal. Then, switch it round and name different ways to move: walk, hop, march, twirl, crawl, gallop, and more!

Empathy

The signs are all there. The glazed eyes, unwashed hair, clothes with stains of undetermined origin, and a nappy bag the size of a small country. First-time parents of a newborn certainly stand out in a crowd. As an “experienced” parent of a toddler, you can empathise with those new parents. It’s why you may let them go ahead of you in line, smile encouragingly, say a kind word in passing, or even bring them dinner. After all, you survived it and your empathy helps a new parent feel like they will, too!

 

Over the years, you learned how to understand another person’s feelings and to respond with care and concern. Now, as a parent, you model for your child how to do the same. Even a young toddler can begin to show empathy by offering a stuffed animal to an upset child or by giving you a hug when you seem sad. In Kindermusik, we give your child plenty of opportunities to discuss, explore, and understand a wide range of feelings and to practice kind behavior in a safe and loving environment. So each time your child experiences happiness when singing a favorite song or sees another child’s frustration when it’s “egg shakers away” time, you are supporting your little one’s development of empathy.

 

Everyday Connection: Feelings nothing more than feelings.

Throughout the day, label your child’s feelings and the feelings of others. “I see you feel happy when you listen to your favourite song.” “It looks like you feel angry that I said you couldn’t eat a biscuit for breakfast.” Recognising your child’s emotions and giving your child the words needed to express and identify emotions helps to build empathy.

Independent Movement

It’s a well-known fact. No matter how much parents wish for it and continue to wish for it, toddlers do not come with an on/off (or even a pause!) button. At some point around the one-year mark, a baby turns into an independent movement machine. Constantly on the go. They are crawling, standing, wobbling and walking. Then, yes, eventually running and jumping everywhere and anywhere. Of course, often away from a parent in a one-sided game of chase! All of this newfound independent movement is exhilarating for children and a wee bit exhausting for parents. Ah, to hit the pause button for a moment!

 

In Kindermusik class each week, we help channel all that movement energy in a way that fosters your child’s growing independence and gross-motor development, and emphasises your unique role as your child’s first and best teacher. When we listen to “Toodala” and practise different motions around the room, dance with our scarves using contrasting movements such as high and low or up and down during “Mrs. Murphy’s Chowder,” or even when your child sits (for a moment!) on your lap to bounce to “Pancake Day, Heigh-Ho,” your little one is discovering new ways to move.

 

Everyday Connection:

On the Go-Go Dancer. Celebrate your child’s love of being on the go with music. Put on some of your favourite songs and dance, walk, wobble, run, and jump around the house. Mix up the music to include fast and slow, loud and soft, and energetic and calm.

 

Preparing for Life – Your Child Is Unique!

Loving Mother and baby singing and bonding, enjoying Kindermusik baby music classes in Burgess Hill

While walking through my bank’s foyer the other day a brochure caught my eye. On the front was a photo of a dad with his young baby about 6 weeks old, fast asleep, lying across his arm and head resting in his hand. The words at the top of the page were, ‘Where’s the manual?’

When you see your newborn baby for the first time, all the knowledge you may have gained from books, courses attended, conversations seem to disappear as you see your own child before you, completely unique, totally original, and astoundingly wonderful and you are responsible for preparing them for life! Where is the manual? Oh if there could only be one manual that would help you to do this right!

Well, we know there is not one manual that can cover it all but if we can start by realising that our child is an original and begin to take time to discover and observe who they are as they begin to grow and develop this can be an enormous help.

I have had the privilege the last 18 years of taking parents on a 7 year journey of discovery with their children. Music and Movement are the key components and I am constantly sharing the benefits of these to families but I would like to focus on my core values which are to nurture and inspire children and parents and their relationship together so they can be better prepared for life. How do I do this?

I start by trying to create an environment that feels safe and appropriate for both the parent and child. For the very youngest age group, 0 – 1 years of age, this would mean asking the parent to take time to observe their babies, to watch their responses to sounds, touch and movement and to discover and adjust their responses accordingly. This brings such freedom in a group setting e.g. a new mum could stop an activity and see that their baby needs to stop being stimulated for now and needs to be fed, a parent may start rolling a shaker on the floor for the baby because the baby wants to be crawling around. The benefits of observation and then exploring together continue for the 1 to 2 year old. Many of this age group have discovered their feet and want to move, move, move and touch everything they can. They are absorbing so much of their environment but need mum or dad to be able to help to make sense of it all. Talking at every opportunity, putting into words and telling them what you see they are doing, saying that you see them rolling the ball, shaking the bell, affirming what they are doing, encouraging them to try something new; taking time to discover together.

At the age of three, when many children are adjusting to becoming more independent and going to nursery or playgroup, being safe will mean feeling secure and if you have had lots of times to observe and explore together you will have a good idea of how you think they are going to cope and you can support them accordingly. At the age of 3 and 4 I have a length of time with the child in a small group with other children on their own and then the parent comes in for a Sharing Time when they can not only see what their child has been doing but also share in the experience together. This Sharing Time is an integral part of every session.  This kind of sharing time continues building foundations of trust and feeling valued.

There is a specific method of observing and exploring which is really worth looking into in more detail. This method is called ‘scaffolding’. I might give a family some shakers and give them free time to play with them together. I ask the parent to observe what their child is doing with them. I encourage the parent to describe to their child what they are doing while imitating their child’s action e.g. shaking fast. The parent then goes on to demonstrate another way of using the instrument, this could be tapping the shaker on the floor or on their knee, rolling the shaker, tapping shakers together, lifting it up high, playing it loudly and quietly, the list goes on. The child feels valued because the parent has shown great interest in what they can do by imitating their initial action and has also encouraged them to try something new. These are fantastic skills for life and learning.

With children from 3 to 7 a form of  ‘scaffolding’can continue during the session as well as in the Sharing Time.  I might get out hoops for example and encourage the children to discover the qualities of a hoop e.g., shape, colour, texture, the way it moves and to allow them free time while I affirm what I see them doing and then encourage them to try discover new things. The possibilities can be endless as hoops not only can be spun and jumped in and out of, they can become cages, boats to sail in, and a sun lifted high in the sky with both hands up!

The 5 to 7 year olds who have already experienced a number of  years of exploring in this way are now ready to try anything new: reading musical notes, moving to different rhythms, playing a glockenspiel. Learning and discovery has become fun and their success is not based on doing everything just right but having the confidence to try and be encouraged in their own successes.

Understanding how children are all unique and have different ways of learning and expressing themselves has helped me on my journey as a parent of 4 children and as a Music and Movement teacher. My greatest joy, and when I know I have done my job well, is to step back and watch my parents begin to play and explore with their children without any prompting. I observe their children’s faces as they are getting all that eye contact and attention from mum or dad and I see the confidence of the parent as they understand what their children love to do and help them to discover new things.

I would like to finish with one of my opening thoughts. We don’t have one manual that tells us how to do everything right but if we realise that our child is unique and we take the time to observe and explore with them as they grow and develop this can be an enormous help!

Simple Maths—Counting and Patterns

One, two, buckle my shoe. Three, four, shut the door. Five, six, pick up sticks. Seven, eight, lay them straight. Nine, ten, begin again. You did it, didn’t you? Before you finished reading that nursery rhyme, you found yourself singing it, instead. It’s okay. You probably do that with the ABCs, too. We can relate. It’s how many of us learned those building blocks of maths and reading—through nursery rhymes, songs, and maybe a few dance moves!

 

And now, a generation later, your toddler learns the same way. Like you did, your little one learns to count by rote—a memorizing process using routine and repetition. Learning to count by rote helps your child develop number vocabulary, memory, patterning, and sequence—all foundational skills for maths. So, in Kindermusik classes each week, we give your child many opportunities to practice counting. When we “roll, roll, roll…1, 2, 3” the rainbow shakers, count to three and jump up during the circle dance, or recite numbers while playing with balls, your child practices counting in a fun, engaging way, which reinforces the beginning stages of learning numbers.

 

Everyday Connection: 1, 2, 3, Count with Me! Toddlers love games. Tap into that love to help reluctant toddlers make smoother transitions from one activity to another. Invite your child to play the “1, 2, 3, Count with Me!” game as you count together how many toys to put away, how many steps it takes to get to the bathtub, or even how many people need a plate for dinner.

Steady Beat

Parents of really young children develop interesting habits: the two-minute shower, the no-hands nappy check, and the need to smell newly opened jars of baby food. One habit above all else, however, catches the attention of music teachers. With a baby or toddler in her arms, a parent will steadily sway back and forth, left and right, just like a human metronome. No wonder steady beat is usually the first musical skill a child learns.

 

At every stage of development, Kindermusik includes steady-beat activities. We know that the benefits of steady beat extend well beyond musical skills. Steady beat gives children the ability to walk effortlessly, speak expressively, and even regulate repeated motions such as riding a bicycle, brushing teeth, or dribbling a ball. In class, your child experiences and responds to a steady beat during lap bounces, instrument play, and yes, even when you hold your little one in your arms and sway back and forth, left and right, at the end of class. Now, that’s a habit you will never want to break.

 

Everyday Connection: And the beat goes on. Look for opportunities for your child to experience steady beat outside the classroom. Put on some music and tap, sway, clap, walk, or bounce to the beat.

Routines and Rituals

Parents of babies need special superpowers. Forget about leaping tall buildings in a single bound or even flying. Parents really need the ability to become invisible in order to check on a sleeping baby, the power to fully function on only 3 hours of interrupted sleep, and the capacity to do the laundry faster than a speeding bullet! Your baby also needs a superpower—the ability to predict the future—and you can help your child by establishing routines and rituals.

 

At Kindermusik, we understand that babies’ brains seek predictable patterns to help regulate their internal clock and navigate daily transitions. Routines and rituals teach your baby that the world is a predictable (and safe) place. It’s one of the reasons we always mark the official start of class with “Heigh-ho Hello” and the end of class with “Goodbye, Babies.” Your baby learns to expect musical playtime after hearing the hello song and predicts it’s time to leave after the goodbye song. Rituals and routines work closely together to provide continuity and connectedness—both vital to your child’s development. (By the way, “eyes in the back of your head” is a handy superpower for the upcoming toddler years.)

 

Everyday Connection: Not Stuck in a Rut. Turn daily routines into special family rituals. Add infant massage after bath time. Dance to a favourite song together after naptime. Go for a stroll after dinner, or snuggle together and read books.

Dynamics: Loud and Quiet

While your child’s sense of hearing began developing in the womb, the basic concept of dynamics—loud and quiet—must be learned. In Kindermusik class, we lead you and your child through a variety of activities to help your little yodeller learn to recognise the difference between loud and quiet sounds. When we play our clip clap instruments loud or soft, “go ‘round the mountain” with loud running feet or quiet tiptoeing feet, imitate the loud or quiet sounds of mama and baby sheep, or even move our scarves quietly or loudly through the corn, your child learns how to listen to and differentiate between loud and quiet sounds. So, the next time your toddler uses an “outside voice” in an inside situation, you can ask in your quiet voice: “How would baby sheep say that”? It just might turn down the volume!

 

Everyday Connection: Keep it Bottled Up. Make toddler-friendly shakers from plastic drink containers and soft (quiet) and hard (loud) items. Then, put on your favourite music from class and play loudly and quietly together!

Baby’s World of Patterns

In Kindermusik, we understand that babies and young children who learn to identify patterns strengthen their sense of safety and feel happier and more relaxed because they can better predict what happens next. Plus, a solid understanding of patterns eventually leads to success in school, especially in math, science, and reading. Each week in class, your baby experiences patterns through rhythm and meter, tempo contrasts, dances, language and vocal play, and the routine of the lesson flow. So, when your baby giggles and wiggles “going into the kitchen to take a peek” or dances with you to the changing tempos of “Peas and Carrots,” your little one gains a greater understanding of patterns—and the world.

 

Everyday Connection: A little night music. Create a special nighttime playlist filled with soothing lullabies. During your child’s last feeding or at the beginning of the nighttime routine, put on this playlist. The predictable pattern of music each night will help your child recognise the end of the day. Try these Kindermusik favourites: http://play.kindermusik.com/en/browse/style/?style_id=35&

Fine Motor Skills

Do you remember when we used to actually call someone on the telephone? Ah, those primitive years! Then texting entered the scene. Many of us watched in amazement as those of a certain age moved their fingers at an alarming rate while we struggled to text even one word on the tiniest of keyboards. Our finger muscles and fine motor skills certainly got a workout as we learned this new skill.

 

Children also need to learn how to use and coordinate their finger, hand, and wrist muscles—not for texting—but for reaching, grasping, and more. In Kindermusik class each week, we include many activities that support your child’s fine motor skills development. Wiggling fluffy chicks in a “Ten Egg” finger play or striking the chime bars on “Sweetly Swings the Donkey” helps your child learn to coordinate hand, finger, and wrist movements that support fine motor control and precision. The skills practised in class and at home build the foundation your child needs for buttoning buttons, zipping zips, tying shoes, using scissors, and even writing. Texting will come later. Much later.

 

Everyday connection: Let your fingers do the walking. Finger plays are great activities to do together anywhere. Waiting at the doctors, going to shops and restaurants, or even at bedtime. Teach your favourite to your child, or pick one learned in class.

Baby’s Social and Emotional World

3,600. That’s the approximate number of times a baby needs a nappy change in the first year alone. (Wow! That’s a lot of nappies.) Each one of those nappy changes satisfies baby’s physical needs, but it also meets his developing social and emotional needs. That’s because every time your baby cries and you respond by relieving his distress, the vital parent-child connection is strengthened. Building an attachment and a sense of trust not only lays a solid foundation for social and emotional development, but also primes your baby’s brain for learning.

 

In Kindermusik classes, we create many moments that strengthen and celebrate this vital parent-child connection. Every time you sing lovingly to your little one, your bond grows stronger. With each gentle touch, rock, or lap bounce, your bond grows stronger. And every time you gaze into your child’s eyes and smile during tummy time, your bond grows stronger. As your baby grows, this attachment—and the resulting sense of security and trust it fosters—gives your little one the confidence to explore new environments, try new things, and make new friends.

 

Everyday Connection: Make massage routine. Routines and rituals help your baby predict what comes next and provide a sense of security. Add infant massage to your nightly bedtime routine for a little extra bonding time. Added bonus: It might just help your little one sleep better, too!

Gross-Motor Skills

 

New parents tend to invest in tons of baby gear—a crib, a stroller, a baby swing, a bouncy seat, a car seat, and, of course, lots and lots of nappies. Sometime around the one-year mark, though, parents realize that they need to invest in one more vital item: a good pair of shoes…for themselves. When you have a toddler, it sometimes feels like you’re never ever going to have the chance to sit down again. After all, toddlers love to be on the go and are constantly looking for ways to try out their developing gross-motor skills—walking, running, hopping, and even climbing stairs and furniture. (Yikes!)

 

We get it. Toddlers learn to move and move to learn. It’s exhausting for parents, but crucial for kids. That’s why we’re so focused on movement in Kindermusik class. We stomp hello at the beginning of the lesson, fly like birds, stand and stretch our arms high like trees, and dance around the room to strengthen and refine the children’s gross-motor skills. All this movement also stimulates the release of brain chemicals that support memory and learning! And the best news for you: no shoes required.

 

Everyday Connection: I got moves like…. Put on some music and play the “I got moves like…” game. Name an animal and ask your toddler to move like that animal. Then, switch it up and name different ways to move: walk, hop, march, twirl, crawl, gallop, and more!

Tuning Your Baby’s Listening Ears

Do you ever just stop and really listen to your surroundings? It’s kind of noisy. You might hear the sounds of music or television commercials, the humming of the refrigerator, birds singing, cars driving by, your baby babbling, wind blowing, a coffee maker brewing, the microwave beeping, someone talking, and more. Thankfully, as an adult, you know how to tune in to the sounds that matter most and tune out the sounds you don’t need to focus on. Babies, however, are still working on this skill.

 

In Kindermusik class, we enhance your baby’s growing discriminatory listening skills when we listen to and imitate instruments, animal noises, and all kinds of other sounds. This ability to detect and attend to sounds, and to distinguish between them, sets your baby on the path to fine-tuned listening and receptive language.

 

Everyday Connection: Tell Me More! Model and encourage active listening—and the art of conversation—by talking with your baby. Pause. Listen to your baby’s reply. Then respond by saying, “Tell me more,” or, “That sounds interesting.”

Nonsense

Do you remember your child’s first few words? Although the OED didn’t include definitions for “da,” “ba-ba,” or “la,” you knew—without a doubt—your little one said daddy, bye, and mummy. (Or, something along those lines!) Now, as a toddler, you may hear your child deliberately making up silly sounding words and giggling profusely. I mean, seriously, blibber-blobber, really is funny! Laughing together over nonsense words supports your child’s growing sense of humour!

 

In Kindermusik, we know that nonsense words also support your child’s early language and literacy development. While your child may laugh at the silliness of nonsense words from class like “Fiddle-dee-dee” or “fuzzy wuzzy,” your child is also practising in the development of specific oral motor skills that create vowels, consonants, or cluster sounds. Nonsense words often employ alliteration and rhyme, which fosters phonemic awareness or the understanding that words are made up of small speech sounds or phonemes. So, blibber-blobber or fiddle-dee-dee away!

 

Everyday Connection: Call the Doctor. Dr. Seuss made a living making up nonsense words like wocket, grickle-grass, and zizzer-zazzer-zuzz. Read some Dr. Seuss this week and add some new nonsense words to your family’s vocabulary.

Fine-Motor Skills

Walk into any family-friendly restaurant, indoor playground, or arcade, and chances are you’ll encounter the Claw. This “game” boasts a glass case full of stuffed animals, sweets, and toys. It looks simple enough: all you have to do is move the lever to position the claw, push the button to drop the claw over the desired item, pick the item up, and bring it to you. Simple, right? Except that it generally doesn’t work out that way. Instead, the claw grasps at nothing, or the item slips back down into the pile, and you’re left empty-handed and down a few pounds.

 

Young toddlers’ first attempts at using their fingers to pick things up look a bit like most people’s experiences with the Claw. But with time and practice, children eventually master all kinds of precise movements. In Kindermusik, we use fingerplays, sign language, hand motions, and instrument play to give children opportunities to strengthen the fine-motor muscles in their fingers, hands, and wrists. Fine-motor muscle control eventually translates into the ability to write, use a fork, button buttons, zip zips, and more!

 

Everyday Connection: Let your fingers do the walking talking. Children learn best through repetition. So go ahead and use sign language from Kindermusik throughout the week to support both language and fine-motor skills.